Woodworking: Oak Deckbox with Walnut Inlay

Before diving into the process, here are some shots of the final result!

Oak and walnut deckbox

Oak and walnut deckbox

Inlay detail

Inlay detail

The lid and danish-oiled interiod

The lid and danish-oiled interiod

I finally got a table saw! Well, a job-site saw, so I can at least cut down on how much space it consumes in the apartment. While I've got a few projects floating around my head, I wanted to have a go at something relatively simple to try out the saw. I settled on a simple deck box, using essentially the same design as the maple deck box I posted previously. The rabbet joints got dropped in favor of mitered corners, though the bottom is still one big inch-deep rabbet joint, and the lid is a simple set-in affair rather than the sliding lid I attempted previously.

Shiny new saw!

Shiny new saw!

The whole concept was to get the box cut, fit, and engraved in a single day, though it did end up bleeding into the week while I experimented with finishes. In that spirit of expediency I went with the straightest 1/4" red oak board I could find at Lowes for the sides and lid, and a 1" chunk of scrap cherry for the base.
 
The saw worked beautifully! A quick cross cut to the sum-width of the sides, a rip to the final height, and a few more cross cuts and the oak was done. You might notice that the stop-block in the photo is cherry, and yes, that was the bit that became the bottom of the box. 
 
Things were going swimmingly until I attempted to route out the lift-hold for the lid on the front panel of the box. Apparently people aren't kidding when they say oak is a "hard wood", the panel actually broke apart where the radius came parallel with the grain! I had a photo, but it got lost along the way.
 
I pulled the saw back out and cut another panel, and this time spent a good deal of time cutting the hole across maybe a dozen shallow cuts. Right at the end, it managed to catch and splinter off anyway. I suppose the lesson here is, when you're routing blind, use a stop block! I managed to find the excised chunk, and decided to just glue it back on. It took fairly well, and after a little sanding, it's essentially invisible! The hole is a bit larger than intended, but still functional.
 
All that was left to do was laser engrave, cut some oak veneer for an inlay, and glue and finish the thing! I'll admit, I didn't have a particular motif in mind for this box, I was just hoping to prove to myself that I could get from concept to product quickly and competently (well.. the I got the first half at least!) I went with the iconic "M", and really like how it came out! I did spent about an hour dialing in the laser settings so there'd be minimal sanding to get the inlay level with the face, but that was quick compared to testing finishes.
 
Oak looks alright with pretty much everything, but doesn't have the same dazzling figure as maple, or even the richness of the walnut, so I spent a while testing out various finishes on scrap material. I was hoping to try out a new finish on this piece, so I opted to use Danish oil (my previous go-to) just for the inside faces. Shellac took ages to apply, even to scrap, and didn't quite look as good as the oil, but spray varnish managed to be easy to apply, as well as pretty nice looking. I went with that, applying 4 coats with 7 minutes of drying between coats, an hour wait, a sanding at 320 grit, and a final coat on top. The sanding ended up being a bit heavier than it should have been, as my spraying produced some noticeable drips, but sanding through them didn't take long.
 
I'm pretty happy with the final product! I'm clearly still learning how to use the tools correctly, but I'm enjoying myself along the way. 

Ulamog, the Creaseless Shirt!

I took a break from other projects for an evening to whip up another shirt pattern. The Eldrazi titans were a tempting target, but I ran into the problem that almost none of the art shows what their leg-tentacle-appendages. Also, across artists, the details on each titan tend to change a little each time. Octopus-like walking-tentacles are what I settled on.

Ironed Ulamog pattern

Ironed Ulamog pattern

Ulamog, the Creaseless Shirt

Ulamog, the Creaseless Shirt

Woodworking: Inlaid Box for Cube

This is a project I've had in the back of my head for more than a year now. Every few months it'd resurface and I'd jot down some dimensions, look into materials, and inevitably get distracted by life. A week ago I had totally open weekend and decided that it was time. Unfortunately I didn't pause to take progress shots, but the vast majority of the techniques are the same as I used in the deckbox and land station. The corners are miter joints, the "floor" and lid are set into 1/8" deep rabbets all the way around, and the dividers simply slot into 1/8" deep dados on both sides.

Materials-wise, I stuck with maple for the frame, with bird's eye figure this time, ceder for the dividers, and baltic birch plywood for the lid and floor. The ceder was a lot softer than I anticipated, but I don't expect much wear on the dividers, and the smell is amazing. The inlay materials are cherry veneer, three colors of paua shell veneer, and five semi-precious stones (being pearl, blue onyx, onyx, carnelian, and malachite).

After sanding to 600 grit the maple and cherry got a coat of danish oil, producing a lovely warm and deep look, but I found in testing that the plywood looked miserable and blotchy with that approach. I ended up going with a few layers of spray varnish and a final sanding with 600 grit and ultra fine steel wool on the plywood, giving it a satin feel and slightly warming up the color without any of the blotching.

Laser cutting the lotus pieces (sorry for the vertical video, I know)

The veneers and lid-inset were all laser cut, requiring six different cutting patterns to get everything matched up and at the right burn-depth. Needless to say, some experimentation went into this process. An additional mini-project came out of this testing as well, which I'll post later on!

Dry fitting inlay

Dry fitting inlay

Dry fitting the shell veneer

Dry fitting the shell veneer

The veneers were attached with a thin later of Titebond I (I know there are better glues, even just TB III, but I didn't want to put off this project for another week) and clamped with wax paper for an hour. The same spray vanish and rub-out procedure was used on both sides of the lid, giving it a wonderful feel. Finally the stones were secured with a drop of cyanoacrylate super glue each.

Beautiful maple figure on the front

Beautiful maple figure on the front

Nice even rows, glue just dried!

Nice even rows, glue just dried!

A head-on shot of the final result

A head-on shot of the final result

While this project was only a marginal step up in complexity, I still learned a ton while working through it. While every small mistake and blemish that ended up in the final piece stand out a lot to me, I'm still really happy with the result!

Both cubes snugly in their new home

Both cubes snugly in their new home!

Even more shirts - Sheoldred and Etched Monstrosity

Note - I'm working on getting all the stencils I've generated into a consistent format, as I do intend on posting them here! It could take a bit, but I wanted to get these shirts and the process post up this weekend. Also, I definitely don't own the original images, they're posted here only for illustration / education purposes.

These might be the last shirts for a while, been on a bit of a tear with them lately. The shirts used for these two (depicting Etched Oracle and Sheoldred, Whispering One) were Hanes Premium X-Temp V-necks, which yielded a more orange color when bleached. To not bury the lede too much, here are the final results!

Sheoldred completed shirt

Sheoldred completed shirt

Etched Monstrosity completed shirt

Etched Monstrosity completed shirt

At this point I've settled into a workflow for generating designs from art, which breaks down into five steps -

Original art - Etched Monstrosity

Original art - Etched Monstrosity

First, isolate the subject. In GIMP I end up using the lasso-select tool and color-select tool as necessary to delete the background. This can take a while if the edges are hard to see, or if the subject blends slowly into the background, like Sheoldred does.

Isolated figure

Isolated figure

Second, create two new layers. The first is a block of black that fills the entire subject, providing a silhouette for later, but is kept "off" for the intermediate steps. Second, a "highlights" layer that sits at the very top of the stack for providing the "gaps" between pieces. These gaps create depth in the final design by allowing objects to pass behind each other, so it's important to grok how the original image is arranged.

Third, as the art on most cards is cropped by the frame, as need to expand the canvas enough to complete the figure. This usually means adding feet, tendrils, arms, etc. so the finished shirt doesn't have an artificial "frame" imposed on it.

Blocking layer with extensions

Blocking layer with extensions

Fourth, and most time-consuming, adding the gaps. On the highlight layer I've settled on using 3-5px wide pencil and pen-curve tools to trace out the boundaries of each piece. Inevitably there's some iteration as I apply these at high zoom, and have to zoom out to make sure it all still parses at a distance.

Completed with highlights

Completed with highlights

Lastly, moving the file (usually in png format) over to Adobe Illustrator, to convert it all into paths. I fell into using the "black and white logo" setting on live trace as it has produced good results so far, but your mileage may vary. The only thing left to do at this point is to expend the resulting object into paths, un-group them, and delete the unnecessary segments. For me, this usually means retained islands of white. If kept, during cutting the laser will attempt to cut the boundary multiple times, isn't ideal.

For the cutter I'm using it expects vector cuts to be 0.01 pt black stroked paths, so I set everything to that and no fill color. I've also found that the speed-power-frequency settings needed to produce good results is about 80/5/2500, on a 150W cutter. After cutting the pieces of freezer paper are taken back home, and the host-shirt is laid out on an ironing board. After centering things up, I can start placing pieces and "gluing" them down with brief contact from a hot iron. Be sure to check you don't iron the wrong side of the paper, it WILL glue itself to your iron. Both of the patterns in this post took about 45-60 minutes to position all the fiddly pieces, tweezers were definitely a must. I've dropped an in-progress shot below.

Placing so many pieces

Placing so many pieces

After it's all ironed down, a plastic poster-holder is slotted into the shirt to prevent bleed-through and bleaching of the back surface, and it's set outside either on the concrete or a protected work surface. I've settled on 4-6 fine sprays, quickly dabbing the excess off of the papered regions with a paper towel, followed by a five minute wait. I did that twice for each of these, followed by a minute or two agitating it a bucket of ice water to halt the bleaching. The water definitely turned orange. Lastly they were both thrown into the washer for a short cycle and dried. That's the whole thing!

Even more shirts

This is a short post, but I did want to show off the Phyrexian Obliterator shirt I made, as I managed to get it signed by Todd Lockwood (the original artist) at Emerald City Comic Con this year! There are two big differences between this and the previous designs I'd done. First was the sheer number of independent pieces of wax paper that had to be positioned relative to one another, thankfully I was able to position and then "fix" a few pieces at a time, and they were generally well behaved. Second was the amount of pre-processing that went in. Rather than starting with someone else's stencil, I started directly with the card art, first isolating the beastie from the background, and then adding breaks to highlight each plane of depth within the image, and eventually pushing it all to illustrator to generate paths. The laser cutter also had a bit  more power than intended, so a few pieces that came out charred had to be re-made by hand with a hobby knife. That all said, I'm really happy with how this came out! Now that it's signed, I'm not sure I'm going to be wearing to on the regular, but might try to frame it somehow.

Ironed and braced for the bleach!

Ironed and braced for the bleach!

Final shirt, signed!

Final shirt, signed!

Bleached Shirts Round 2

A quick update; I cracked out another bleached shirt, this one based on the moogle-in-magitek-armor image by DeviantArt user Camac, straight out of FF6 for the SNES. It took some tweaking to make the pattern contiguous for the laser cutter, but not too much. A quick observation: the brand of the shirt seems to have a big impact on the minimum realizable feature size. We couldn't find the soft fancy v-necks we'd been buying, so settled on a four-pack of Haynes crew-neck shirts. They're comfy enough, but noticeably thinner and bleached substantially faster (think 10-20 seconds rather than 2-4 minutes to transition from black to maroon-pink). I stuck with the same freezer-paper and ironing method I've described previously.

Ironed pattern

Ironed pattern

Final result!

Final result!

For future patterns on these shirts I'll probably aim for thicker features and a finer spray at a larger distance, as I'm not totally happy with the the blurring on this one. Still, more SNES nostalgia is always good.

Jewelry: First attempts - Rings

This past weekend I was able to take a class on jewelry and metalworking at The Crucible in Oakland; the tuition was covered as a Christmas gift. I thoroughly enjoyed the class, and learned enough to produce the rings shown below with minimal guidance. We covered stamping, sawing, filing, rolling, soldering, and finishing;the metals we worked with were silver, copper, and brass (primarily for cost reasons, gold is even more insanely expensive than I remembered.) The first ring in the gallery involved a lot of sawing and drilling, which I still need to improve with, as well as eight hard solder joints to hold the copper bits inside the silver voids. There were additional pieces generated during the stamping and embossing tutorials, but I'll keep the post here to the rings. My only frustration with the class was how quickly I ran out of ideas. I really wish I had walked in with a pile of concepts rather than just one or two! Definitely looking to obtain some of the tooling to continue this sort of work at home, and combine it with my lapidary / faceting aspirations.

Silver and copper ring

Silver and copper ring - Roughly a DNA double-helix

Textured copper ring 1

Textured copper ring 1 - Snakeskin

Copper and brass ring

Copper and brass ring - Triangle motif

Textured copper ring 2

Textured copper ring 2 - Dots

Woodworking: Curly Maple Deckbox

My second real project in wood, a commander-sized deckbox, represented a step up in joint complexity and wood quality. I also had to deal with an unexpected issue, namely wood movement. The board of curly maple was purchased months ahead of time, with a couple different ideas in mind, and during that interval it went from a beautifully flat and square board, to a pringles-chip shaped board with slightly off-true edges. Had I been more motivated, I suppose I could have use a hand plane and pared it down to flat. With time at a premium, and a deep conviction that clamping and gluing can do amazing things, I did my best to roll with it.

I also tried to remember to take process photos as I went, not only to share here, but also for my own benefit the next time I kick off a project. The basic design was pretty simple: rabbet joints, rabbet joints everywhere. The four vertical walls of the box all get an eighth-inch deep 3/4 inch tall rabbet along their bottom edge to accommodate a beefy cheery base, and additional rabbets along the vertical edge for the left and right sides. One concern from the outset was the stability of cutting an eighth inch of material away from panels only a quarter inch thick, but going slowly, it did work out. Additionally, an eighth inch deep, quarter inch tall, slot was cut into the back and side panels to allow for a side-in lid. It's worth noting here that the lid had to be subtly tapered by sanding the edges meant to mate with the slots to allow for easy movement.

Raw materials

Raw materials

The raw materials were a 24" x 5" x 0.25" board of curly maple, and a 3/4" thick board of cherry (which I'd previously been using as a backstop to prevent tear-out when sawing). Both boards were wider than my miter box would allow, so I ended up using clamps and the straight edge of other boards to establish the cuts. In the photo below, the saw is neatly guided by straight-edged stock on both sides.

Sawing setup

Sawing setup

All the pieces

All the pieces

With all the pieces cut, the front panel (notably 0.25" shorter than the others, to permit the lid to slide out) was off to the laser cutter. I should also note, the design is not mine, it was found here, and was simply too cool to pass up. Maple takes laser engraving very well, and even grey-scale depth features were rendered very well.

Laser-cut design

Laser-cut design

Unfortunately I forgot to take any photos during the routing step, but they were all executed with a 0.25" flat router bit at medium-low speed. For the finish, I wanted the grain to really pop, so I used the remainder of the board as a test piece (seen far left in the photo below). The top portion of the test piece got two coats of diluted anoline dye, then two coats of Danish oil, while the bottom simply got the oil. I settled on dye+oil again, but in retrospect should probably have gone darker (less dilute) on the dye. The blue-taped areas, aside from the test piece, were to exclude oiling the gluing surfaces.

Finishing

Finishing

After a brief dry-fit, gluing and clamping went on for two days. I did have to make a second pass, as a small gap opened up in one of the corners, but after that it looked good.

Gluing and clamping

Gluing and clamping

Finally, here are some photos of the final product!

FullSizeRender (2) IMG_1693

I probably won't rely so heavily on rabbet joints in the future, but this was super instructive in the difficulties and details of executing them. Also, this came together more quickly than the first project! As I get my basic skills in line, things go a bit faster and smoother, but there's still seemingly infinite room still to grow.

Woodworking: MTG Land Station

I've been playing around with the idea of woodworking for pretty much the whole year now, watching videos on YouTube and tearing through a few books on the topic. I did a few simple projects leaning heavily on the laser cutter to do all the operations, but that isn't really woodworking. I finally decided to put together a land station, that is, a box for people to grab basic lands on those rare times a draft comes together!

The design is fairly simple, four planks of wood for the sides of the box, with 45 degree mitred edges, and four dados (slots) for dividers, plus a flat plank as a bottom. The dimenions of a card are (roughly) 3.5 inches tall, but 2.5 inches wide, and I ran with those for my first attempt. Trying to put a 45 degree miter along a 3.5 inch edge with a hand saw was a losing battle, and the prospect of putting in eight dados with a router plane (something like this) sounded frustrating. After quite a bit of hemming and hawing, I eventually bit the bullet and bought a router, some bits, and a table for it. While there was a sale going on at the time, I certainly had to convince myself that I'm excited for more than this one project.

The dimensions were driven in part by the cheap wood I had access to, namely long planks of quarter-inch thick, 3.5 inch wide pine. I kept the height and stuck with a single thickness to simplify the sawing operations, which are harder than they look. I ended up using a cheap clamping mitre box to establish a perpendicular cut line, and then clamped the piece to a heavy piece of scrap for the remainder of the cut to prevent tear-out (an issue that frustrated me enormously at first.)

My initial design had tolerances that ended up being too tight, and it was going to be impossible to get the cards in and out. The final dimensions of each piece are laid out below. The critical number turned out to be 2.75 inches -  the width of the empty space (measured from divider edge to divider edge, not centers) for each card "lane". If that sounds a little too big, it's because it is, but a small error one way or the other won't prevent cards from getting into or out of the box. In the future I'll probably shave 1/8th inch off that value to reduce card "jiggle" in something like a deck box.

  • 2x sides (L/R) -  3.5" x 5.5" x 0.25"
  • 2x sides (F/B) - 3.5" x 15.25" x 0.25"
  • 1x bottom - 5.5" x 15.25" x 0.25"
  • 4x dividers - 3.5" x 5.25" x 0.25"

The dados to retain the dividers are 1/8th (0.125) inch deep on the front and the back, and were cut with the fence fixed to ensure they ended up aligned. I had to make up a 90 degree jig by clamping some heavy blocks to cut the furthest-in dados, as the fence can only move about 5 inches back from the bit, but it worked well enough. The mitres were put on with a 45 degree router bit, over many passes to carefully creep up on the proper depth. Once all the cuts were done, the front panel was off to the laser.
 


 

The pattern was generated using the vector mana symbols generously posted by Goblin Hero over at Slightly Magic, they had just to be scaled and moved around to fit the panel. I put down some masking tape to prevent resin deposition on the wood, but it also seems to have caused some line-artifacts in the final cut, likely due to "thick" overlaps attenuating the beam. In the future I'll probably avoid using tape and just sand the surface clean afterward, as the residual adhesive also looked to interfere with the dye and oil in a few places. For reference, it was cut on an Epilog Ext36 150W in raster mode at 600 DPI, 100% speed, 70% power, in a single pass.

Cut pieces laid out for dry-fitting

Cut pieces laid out for dry-fitting

After sanding all the sides with a ~250 git sanding sponge, the sides and panels were glued together using titebond and a 90 degree clamp, something I didn't even know existed before needing one. I was able to snugly fit in the divider into the back without glue, and press the front panel on for gluing.

Gluing the front panel

Gluing the front panel (bottom is not attached)

After letting it dry over night, I was ready to dye and finish it. I'd experimented with some scrap wood from the same boards to see how the dye and oil finishes would look, and settled on Transtint golden brown diluted in water, and a Danish Oil finish. I applied the dye carefully, given all the warnings it comes with, and gave it plenty of time to dry. Then the oil finish went on and took all night to set, I opted for a single layer as I wasn't looking for a shiny or silky appearance, just sealed. At this point I finally glued on the bottom and gave it a few hours to set.

Nest of clamps

Nest of clamps

Finished land station

Finished land station

It definitely took a lot more time, effort, and learning to finish this than I anticipated, but I am happy with how it came out. I've already gotten a lot of good suggestions for improving it (e.g. cutting semi-circular access holes at the front of each row so you can always get at the cards, also adding a lid isn't a bad idea), but will probably move on to other projects for the time being. The next on my list is a commander deck box, and after that, a substantially more intricate box for my cube to live in. I've got to spread out that tooling cost somehow!

Bleached Shirts with a Laser Cutter

With a whole week off around Thanksgiving, Ouliana and I finally had time to test out a method for templating bleached shirts we'd seen online. It needs freezer paper, which as far as I can tell is butcher paper with wax on one side only. The plan consists of cutting out your pattern, and ironing the waxed side onto the shirt, applying your bleach-water solution, and peeling off the mask. The twist being that cutting precise patterns is a pain, but a laser should be able to make quick work of it!

For the pattern, I came across this image of Samus from the Metroid games, posted by terrorsmile on DeviantArt. I wanted the pattern to be a true stencil, meaning having at least one totally contiguous region to be the "mask". That took some doing, about an hour of work in GIMP, but I ended up with an inverted stencil that could be cut without producing "islands".  I'm a bit reluctant to share the file, as it's based so closely on someone elses's work, but the process is fairly straightforward (the magic-wand selection tool will immediately show you any "islands" left in your image.)

The other issue that came up was the freezer paper tends to curl (it does come on a roll), so it had to be taped down at the edges to a rigid substrate, scrap acrylic in this case. The second pattern was a manually made stencil of the "doom guy" dolls from the 2016 Doom game that Ouliana made, seen getting ironed on below.

Ironing the freezer paper

Ironing the freezer paper

The positive-stencil of the doom guy did end up having "islands", meaning a few pieces of freezer paper had to be carefully place and individually ironed on. Also, having a positive pattern mean needing to block off the rest of the shirt with extra paper to prevent any stray bleaching. The negative stencil, shown below just after ironing, needed no additional masking.

Samus stencil applied

Samus stencil applied

I opted for a slow and regular application of 50/50 bleach in water solution, spraying a few times, and giving it 5-10 minutes to act and dry, and repeated that roughly three times. The shirts were then rinsed out in the shower, and immediately washed. We noticed that setting the iron too low resulted in poor bonding, so the paper would "pop" off the shirt, and ironing too hot resulted in small beads of wax around the edges of the stencil that remained after peeling away the paper. They can be picked off by hand, but it is a pain. The final result of my shirt attempt is below!

Samus shirt!

Samus shirt!